Herman Rednick  (1902- 1985)

Herman Rednick  (1902- 1985)

Herman Rednick Center 

Herman Rednick Center 

Death  / Oil on Canvas / 36"x26"

Death  / Oil on Canvas / 36"x26"

Guidance

Guidance

Herman Rednick 

Herman Rednick was born in 1902, graduated with honors from the National Academy of Design in New York City in 1927, and was drafted into the army in 1942, serving in the Pacific.

Following WWII, he moved to Taos, NM, and continued his study of art. Although Herman explored artistically the unique Taos subjects of the day--the stunning sunsets and the classic faces of the people of Taos Pueblo--he also deepened his artistic exploration of his life’s passion, the spiritual reality and presence he lived in and experienced visually in his meditations. These visions formed the foundation for his mystical paintings.

The last fifteen years of his life he devoted both to painting and to teaching meditation and "the Path of Love and Service." He died in 1985.

The Path of Love Teachings

Herman Rednick taught the transformation of the personality through love and service that opens us to experience the spiritual reality or presence in our lives.  He taught that we are not alone in this journey, but accompanied by angelic beings and a spiritual brotherhood, and that there is a sacred destiny for every person and for the earth itself. 

His teachings evolved out of his own intense meditation experiences.  He explored the mysteries of ancient Egypt and Tibet, reflected on the life of Christ and the New Testament, and meditated on nature, opening the door to unseen worlds.  His teachings include lessons on the nature and development of love, the higher worlds, healing, the Holy Mother, the reappearance of the Christ, the use of daily life as yoga, the use of marriage as a spiritual path, and Western esoteric and Tibetan traditions. 

Techniques for the spiritual work include gratitude for every experience, love for every person we know, re-writing negative experiences, creative expression, meditation, visualization, and mantra.  These tools help to transform the personality and clear the channel for the light and love of the true self and soul. 

 There is also a well-established Path of Love group in Tucson, AZ, with Robert Van Arsdale as teacher.

Paintings

Herman Rednick studied painting at the National Academy of Design in New York City from 1923 to 1927, graduating with honors for his figures and portraits.  He exhibited at the National Gallery in New York and at galleries in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.  As his inner life intensified through his practice of meditation, the subjects of his paintings moved from portraits, nudes, and landscapes to vivid and prismatic depictions of inner worlds. Beginning in 1936, his mystical paintings were exhibited in New York and later in Los Angeles, Ojai, Santa Fe, and towards the end of his life, exclusively in Gallery A, in Taos, NM.

Herman’s paintings chronicled his inner journeys.  Early paintings include a series in watercolor from his meditations on the life of Christ and a series in oil on canvas of esoteric images (1940s)  After he moved to Taos, his works show ancient Mayan temples and modern-day events suggesting a spiritual dimension.  A variety of lithographs range from depictions of Christ healing the leper to the spirit of war to portraits of men and women in Taos Pueblo (1950s-60s).  Caseins from this period are detailed renderings of mystical subjects.  In his later oils (1970s-80s), a palette of intense rainbow-like colors reveals a world of temples on high mountain peaks, a spiritual brotherhood, and spirits of nature. For a look at some of Herman's paintings, click here.

Since the images in Herman’s painting were inspired by his meditations, these paintings may be used as objects of meditation and can act as doorways to higher states of consciousness. 

The Herman Rednick Center, maintained by The Herman Rednick Trust, cares for Herman’s home, and displays many of his paintings, as does the nearby Meditation Temple.

Also see: FireInTheHeart.net and HermanRednick.com

Kuan-yin

Kuan-yin